The Paper Chase: Why My Piece of Paper isn’t Just a Piece of Paper

Maygan Eugenie Forbes | 18 April 2017

I recently came across an article on Forbes.com that told the story of a contributor, Neil Patel, who has deep regrets over pursuing his degree. In this article Patel writes: “Don’t listen to them! It’s not worth it…college was a waste of time, a waste of energy, a waste of money, and a waste of potential.” He then goes on to give a small description of his degree, and his early ambition to become an entrepreneur (which, according to Patel, is a job title that does not require a degree). He then proceeds to list a set of substantial degrees that he believes to be worth the time, energy, and money of a degree. For the sake of my word count I won’t write out the list, but I can tell you now, as a Film Studies MSc student, I don’t make the grade according to Patel. Everybody’s different but without a doubt, every degree counts. But is the question here less about the value of a degree and more about a void in cultural experience? Are we missing out on great wonders, wasting our limited time by being a servant to educational institutions, regardless of what degree we are pursuing?

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Tourism and Travel Writing: Middle Class Privilege Entrenched in Colonialism?

28th Novermber 2016 ¦ Charlotte Kessler.

Postcolonial theory has helped to shine a light on the inherent cruelty of imperialism. The Western world has been highly criticised for its colonial past, treatment of other cultures and lack of respect for difference. Today, cosmopolitan thought promotes the ‘global citizen’ who embraces these cultural differences. Yet an examination of tourism and travel writing exposes how this cosmopolitanism is really received and performed by society. The growth in popularity of travel blogs raises important questions about contemporary colonialism.

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Where You Read: What Does It Say About You?

December 16, 2015 | Louise Adams.

Reading spaces have been important in British culture since literacy itself took hold. Places such as libraries, bedrooms and railway carriages have been fiercely debated for their suitability as locations for reading. And frequently these views are not so much concerned with the places themselves, but with what they say about the kinds of readers using them.

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