On Photography: imprisoning reality, possessing the past

Dexter Yim | 03 June 2019
Human beings are nostalgic animals. We cannot really help looking at photos we took from time to time in order to revisit our past or see how much we have changed over the years. I bet everyone understands this as the ten-year challenge craze sweeps the world. Without photography, we have no choice but to rely on our hazy memories, which are not reliable and verifiable. The art and usefulness of photography unarguably and gradually became indispensable in our daily lives as photography can help us imprison reality and revisit the past at any time. This short article attempts to look into the usefulness and limitations of photography.

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When She Goes Away

Ana Isabel Martinez | February 12, 2018
When I first arrived in Edinburgh, I had to stay for ten days at an Airbnb that was about a half an hour walk from the university. Every day, I had to walk up a hill and make my way through the new city. By about the third day, I started to notice some strange habits as I walked. The first was that for the first five minutes of the walk I would fuss about my clothing. I would think to myself “shirt? Ok, Hair? Fine, Pants? Maybe too tight, etc…”. The next part of the journey consisted of two things. The first was walking, staring, moving my arms and head, in a performative way. In a way that I felt looked right, attractive, or interesting.

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Social Media Strikes Back

Maria Elena Torres-Quevedo | 17 October 2016

Social media empowers individuals who usually lack epistemic power, and hence suffer systemic testimonial injustice (people who are rarely listened to or considered credible by society at large: women, people of colour, trans people, etc.), to testify in meaningful ways. By posting on the internet, they can complicate and undermine state sanctioned narratives in a way that mainstream media cannot.

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