On Photography: imprisoning reality, possessing the past

Dexter Yim | 03 June 2019
Human beings are nostalgic animals. We cannot really help looking at photos we took from time to time in order to revisit our past or see how much we have changed over the years. I bet everyone understands this as the ten-year challenge craze sweeps the world. Without photography, we have no choice but to rely on our hazy memories, which are not reliable and verifiable. The art and usefulness of photography unarguably and gradually became indispensable in our daily lives as photography can help us imprison reality and revisit the past at any time. This short article attempts to look into the usefulness and limitations of photography.

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The Proustian Experience of Wine Tasting

Alice de Galzain | 6 March 2017.

Three years ago, since I was a literature student in Paris, I did what 99% of students do at the beginning of summer: start looking for a summer job. And for various inexplicable reasons, I decided that I would try my luck and leave my resume at a very fancy restaurant next to my house. The restaurant was Enrico Bernardo’s Il Vino and that job became the most memorable work experience of my life. From the very first day, I was able to learn that liking wine is very different from knowing about it. Yet, apart from that youthful realisation, I was taken aback by how my world – the world of literature, language, and words – surprisingly connected with the world of wine. The poetic nature of wine tasting opened so many unforeseen parallels that the associations between the literary world and somellerie just started to multiply.

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Remembrance of Novels Past: Nicholson Baker’s “Memory Criticism”

Richard Elliott | 6 March 2017

From the masterpieces of Marcel Proust and Virginia Woolf to recent classics such as Julian Barnes’s The Sense of an Ending, the subject of memory has exercised some of the finest minds of modern literature. Indeed, think of the last novel you read and chances are that a good deal of the narrative was devoted to memory, whether in the form of childhood memories (as in Zadie Smith’s Swing Time), traumatic memories (Eimear McBride’s The Lesser Bohemians), or, more atypically, prenatal memories (Ian McEwan’s Nutshell).

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