Fogging Lit Crit: Tale of Two Critics

Kate Lewis Hood and Niki Holzapfel | 3 April 2017.

Fog everywhere. Fog up the river, where it flows among green aits and meadows; fog down the river, where it rolls defiled among the tiers of shipping and the waterside pollutions of a great (and dirty) city. Fog on the Essex marshes, fog on the Kentish heights. Fog creeping into the cabooses of collier-brigs; fog lying out on the yards and hovering in the rigging of great ships; fog drooping on the gunwales of barges and small boats. Fog in the eyes and throats of ancient Greenwich pensioners, wheezing by the firesides of their wards; fog in the stem and bowl of the afternoon pipe of the wrathful skipper, down in his close cabin; fog cruelly pinching the toes and fingers of his shivering little ‘prentice boy on deck. Chance people on the bridges peeping over the parapets into a nether sky of fog, with fog all round them, as if they were up in a balloon and hanging in the misty clouds.

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The Song of a Poet: Leonard Cohen, Bob Dylan and the Boundaries of Literature.

14th November 2016 ¦ Aran Ward Sell.

‘Ring the bells that still can ring / Forget your perfect offering

There is a crack, a crack in everything / That’s how the light gets in’

These lines have been quoted reverently since Leonard Cohen’s death. The maudlin yet shimmering sentiment is powerfully poetic, and no less so for being sung. Cohen’s ancient, weighty timbre does not dilute his words; it fuels them. He enters a long tradition of revered bards, from Homer to Burns, whose poetry has been performed or sung. No-one argues that because Shakespeare’s plays are performed, they are merer than Literature. And yet, when Bob Dylan was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature 2016, an equivalent objection was raised against his songwriting.

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What would you create to describe your creative process?

October 30, 2015 | Lisa Naas

The creative process is present across disciplines and used by everyone from artists to bakers to computer programmers to teachers. But though it is a highly personal endeavour, are there patterns or elements inherent to these individual processes? Lisa Naas’s videoart SORROWS documents her own creative process specific to her glass and sound project.

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