Reading Between the Panels: Comics and Critical Theory

November 9, 2015 | Tom Sewel.

How do we read comics? How are the ways in which we read comics changing? For most of their history, the ways in which we have read and talked about comics has been left to comics fandoms to decide. While this has produced a passionate proliferation of reading approaches, it has meant that critical rigour has only very rarely been brought to bear on this uniquely multi-modal narrative form. With the academy’s relatively recent acceptance of comics as literature, this public conversation is now seeing a seismic shift.

Read Article →

Trying to Research the History of China and Japan While Knowing Absolutely no Chinese or Japanese. (And never going to China or Japan.)

November 1, 2015 | Adam Cohen.

I’ve now written two dissertations during two different degrees with a grand total of 25,000 words on Japanese and Chinese history and yet whenever I tried to tell anyone what I was working on I would, without fail, have the following conversation: ‘Oh so how well do you speak Japanese/Chinese?’ I don’t, and I sure as hell can’t read it. ‘When are you going out to China/Japan?’ I’m not, at least not before the deadline. These were fair enough questions to ask and no doubt someone who did speak the language would have written a much better thesis than the one that I churned out. I know a lot of people though who started to narrow down a global research area, came up against these language/travel barriers, and immediately veered away from non-English history entirely, and I think this leaves a wealth of potential scholarship unexplored.

Read Article →

Learning From Journals: What can we Learn From ‘The Landswoman’?

November 2, 2015 | Cherish Watton.

The Women’s Land Army was a civilian organisation set up during World War One and used again in World War Two until 1950. Women replaced men on the land, working in multiple roles in agriculture, forage (haymaking for food for horses) or timber cutting. What can we learn about the representation of women’s wartime work from The Landswoman journal?

Read Article →

Going AWOL: From University to ‘Real Life’

October 31, 2015 | Sarah Hertz.

Hi, my name is Sarah and I am a grad school dropout. Well, not really — I’m actually a graduate of the University of Cambridge who decided not to pursue a PhD. Halfway through my Master’s in Renaissance literature, it began to dawn on me that life exists outside of academia. To the horror of my mentors as well as my former self, I developed a taste for tiaras, hip hop, and climbing the roofs of seventeenth-century colleges. Indeed, my year at Cambridge was primarily one of personal as opposed to intellectual growth.

Read Article →

What would you create to describe your creative process?

October 30, 2015 | Lisa Naas

The creative process is present across disciplines and used by everyone from artists to bakers to computer programmers to teachers. But though it is a highly personal endeavour, are there patterns or elements inherent to these individual processes? Lisa Naas’s videoart SORROWS documents her own creative process specific to her glass and sound project.

Read Article →