The Siren’s Call: Mica Levi’s Soundscapes of Alien Femininity

Katie Goh | 15 May 2017

Under the Skin (Jonathan Glazer, 2014) opens with a bright white light shining into the audience, which then morphs into an eye over the span of five minutes, accompanied by a crescendo of buzzing violins. The opening is disturbing and abstract, setting the tone for the film’s sonic and visual imagery and for the alien language created by Mica Levi’s soundscape.

Mica Levi’s second film score was for Jackie (2016), Pablo Lerrain’s biopic of America’s most famous widow, first lady Jacqueline Kennedy. The film chronicles Jackie’s response to the aftermath of her husband’s assassination as she simultaneously processes her personal grief and works to mythologize her husband’s legacy. Both Lerrain and Glazer’s films are about alien femininity: whereas Under the Skin centres on a literal alien playing as woman, Jackie follows an alienated woman.

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Rooms of One’s Own: Teenage Bedrooms in Film  

Katie Goh | 6 February 2017

Juno’s hamburger phone. Cher’s computerized wardrobe. Ferris Bueller’s Union Jack. Regina George’s PRINCESS four poster bed. As memorable as the characters, the teen movie bedroom set has become iconic in pop culture. Spaces of rebellion, creativity, and conflict, the bedroom functions as a visual indicator of a teenager’s personality as it is the only space wholly their own.

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‘I made lemonade’: The Female Confessional in the Twenty-First Century

31 October 2016 ¦ Katie Goh

Confession: I love Sylvia Plath. The honesty of her poetic expression, the seeds of wisdom in her journals, the technical skill of her story stories, and the fundamental relatability of Esther Greenwood. As a teenager, I was seduced.

But then I went to university. From the lecturer who dismissed Plath as ‘privileged, confessional neediness,’ to boys at parties who scorned her while worshipping Bukowski, to Woody Allen’s patronising ‘interesting poetess’ dismissal in Annie Hall. It was embarrassing to like Sylvia Plath.

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