Brexit Will Hurt British Literature and Publishing Industry

By Conor Kavanagh|The Immigration Advice Service| 28 October 2019
… Britain’s publishing industries are some of the world’s most prominent – from Penguin Random House to Bloomsbury –  and help contribute a significant part of the £87 billion a year that the creative industry brings to the UK. However due to a rise in xenophobia, the stricter migration laws and the economic changes Brexit will bring, foreign authors and the British publishing industry are at risk. … Edward Said, a Palestinian-American writer, in his 1979 book ‘Orientalism’, helped expose how our ‘knowledge’ of different peoples and countries was often shaped and written by those who were not a part of them. …

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Stranger Things 3: Cold War Gone Upside Down

By Anne Liebig| 02 October 2019
SPOILERS AHEAD. On 4th July 2019, the third season of Stranger Things hit Netflix and quickly pulled off its favourite stunt – defying the sequel trap. Once again, the show satisfied viewer demands and climbed to critics’ top scores for the third time running. The long-awaited return to monster-ridden Hawkins not only features delightful performances by its stellar cast, but also widens the playing field for the series’ baddies: other than the familiar killer goo that is the Demogorgon, who are Hawkins’ child heroes up against in 1980s America, and on the most patriotic of holidays no less? You’ve guessed it: the Russians.

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Pockets and the fight for the female body

By Orlaith Darling| 03 September 2019
I have dropped my phone down the toilet several times. Why? The pockets in women’s clothing. I own jeans with pockets into which I can barely fit my hand. I own jeans which have the cruel illusion of pockets stitched into the fabric. It is a fairly well-known fact that, as one writer puts it, ‘mid-range fashion is a male dominated business, driven not by form and function, but by design and how fabric best drapes the body.’

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Making a micro-budget film about Artificial Intelligence

By Luka Vukos | July 16, 2019
A presentation by Luka Vukos – ‘Making a micro-budget film about artificial intelligence’. Presented as part of Blethers, an evening of academic storytelling from the University of Edinburgh, February 2019. Luka describes the making of the short film, ‘Lose Like a Human’. Lose Like a Human won Best Original Score and Audience Choice Award at Hyperdrive Sci-Fi & Fantasy Film Festival 2018.

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Sonic Intensified Continuity in ‘Baby Driver’

By Ruochen Zhao | 19 June 2019
In this audio-visual essay, Ruochen analyses the music and sound used in Baby Driver (2017) – in particular, what theorist Amanda McQueen has identified as the concept of ‘Sonic Intensified Continuity’ used by (director) Edgar Wright in films such as Saun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz and Scott Pilgrim vs the world.

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Feminism Gone Mad? Keira Knightley, mothering and the case against the Disney princess

Tia Byer | March 25, 2019
A presentation by Tia Byer, “Feminism Gone Mad? Keira Knightley, mothering and the case against the Disney princess”.
Tia won the award for ‘Most Controversial’ at LLC Blethers, an evening of academic storytelling with the University of Edinburgh, February 2019.

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Shakespeare vs. Pushkin – On Not Reading National Poets, or: A Tragedy in Two Acts

Anne Liebig | 4 February, 2019
To be or not to be – who has not heard, used, or abused this phrase, written down over 400 years ago? Who cannot conjure up a spontaneous image of the Bard, or name at least one of his plays? Shakespeare has performed a feat that few other writers have achieved across the globe: he has been elevated to a symbol of national culture. But when did you last stop and ask yourself what the point of having a so-called national poet really was?

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Being an Older Youngest

Katherine Carlman | 14 January, 2019
“I’m very good at math,” the boy said as I passed. He was five or six years old and made this declaration not to me, but to the adult who belonged with him. With his mop of long curls and declaration of brilliance, he had more self-confidence than I’ve ever had. How could a child have more self-assurance than a fifty-year-old woman? He must be an only child, I reasoned – maybe an oldest child, but certainly not the youngest.

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On the Hollywood Trend of Woman-Centered Remakes

Whitney Hubbell | July 3, 2018
Ocean’s 8 has just hit theaters and so far has unsurprisingly received mixed reviews. The film definitely has appeal: it boasts an undeniably great cast – Cate Blanchett, Helena Bonham Carter, Sandra Bullock, Mindy Kaling, Anne Hathaway, even Rihanna – and an intriguing concept, being an all-woman heist film. However, the film’s title and the name of Sandra Bullock’s character (Debbie Ocean) reveals that it’s basically just a rehashing of the earlier Ocean’s films starring George Clooney as Danny Ocean. But Ocean’s 8 is just the latest in a growing trend of Hollywood remakes in which the formerly male cast is replaced with women.

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