Sun Ra Arkestra: a Mythical Rebirth

By Alexandra Huang| 18 September 2019
The American avant-garde jazz band Sun Ra Arkestra is whimsically dubbed after the ancient Egyptian mystagogues in worship of the Sun. Led by the eponymous pianist of the band since the 1930s, the musicians have created some outlandish soundscapes described as “dark, kinetic sounds bursting with spiky electric piano or fuzzy keyboard lines and collective horn freak-outs that would likely send most punk rockers screaming from the room.” Eerie and bizarre as their music sounds, these improvisers blatantly claim themselves to be “tone-scientist” and “architects of the plane of discipline,” namely, scientists of sound who can achieve mathematic precision.

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Making a micro-budget film about Artificial Intelligence

By Luka Vukos | July 16, 2019
A presentation by Luka Vukos – ‘Making a micro-budget film about artificial intelligence’. Presented as part of Blethers, an evening of academic storytelling from the University of Edinburgh, February 2019. Luka describes the making of the short film, ‘Lose Like a Human’. Lose Like a Human won Best Original Score and Audience Choice Award at Hyperdrive Sci-Fi & Fantasy Film Festival 2018.

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How Entertainment Dismantles Reality in Black Mirror

Yan Li | 18 February, 2019
Have you ever pondered over the relationship between how we are entertained and who we are? The TV drama Black Mirroris often regarded as science fiction that aims to reexamine the role of technology in our society. However, I see this episode differently. It is more like an attack on (overly) widespread, immoderate and reckless entertainment than a denunciation of technology. In other words, it is the way human beings present and perceive themselves via entertainment that is being mocked, and technology is the accomplice in this five-act tragedy. 

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‘What it means to be a human being’

Gabriel Smith | 11 February, 2018
Upon entering a bookshop, the canny reader/consumer (a heart-breaking slash) becomes aware that critics’ praise now adorns the cover of every newly released book, and therefore no book can be chosen on the basis of what critics are saying on its dustjacket. A massively inflationary adjectival market has rendered superlatives valueless.

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